NooCube Vs Alpha Brain: Which Is Right For You?

NooCube vs Alpha Brain Nootropics

27th October 2023

NooCube vs Alpha Brain: Testing And Comparing These Two Brain Boosters

If you're looking for a top tier nootropic, you will soon come across NooCube (from Wolfson Brands Ltd) and Alpha Brain (from Onnit Labs Inc). Both claim to offer improved mental clarity, focus, and overall cognitive health. But how do they truly compare? In this NooCube vs Alpha Brain showdown, we will put both supplements to the test. We'll also put their formulations under the microscope, diving deep into their individual ingredient lists, dosages, and the science behind their claims.

NooCube boasts a compelling blend that includes Bacopa Monnieri, L-theanine, and the intriguing LuteMax 2020, among others. Alpha Brain, on the other hand, uses proprietary blends including Onnit Flow and Onnit Focus, containing ingredients such as Vinpocetine and the Pterostilbene. We'll break down the evidence behind their claims, test each supplement for ourselves, and scientifically dissect their ingredient lists.

Overall Results And Recommendation


NooCube

92%
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Overall Rating

Alpha Brain vs NooCube

Alpha Brain

43%
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Overall Rating

NooCube vs Alpha Brain Testing
  • Alpha Brain: Style Over Substance? - Strong branding may overshadow a comprehensive look into product quality.
  • NooCube: Scientific Rigor: Emphasizes a transparent, scientific approach to formulation, ensuring each ingredient's dosage is research-backed.
  • Alpha Brain's Main Issues: Proprietary blends mask exact ingredient quantities, and key ingredients are under-dosed.
  • NooCube's Comprehensive Formulation: Broad range of clinically dosed ingredients offers a broad range of cognitive enhancements, from memory to focus.
  • Our Verdict: NooCube outperformed Alpha Brain in our testing, offering a noticeable, sustained cognitive boost.
  • Trust Factor: NooCube's claims are not only evidence-backed but were also experienced firsthand, making it our top recommendation.

Quick Decision Guide - NooCube vs Alpha Brain

CRITERIA

Alpha brain

NooCube vs Alpha Brain Testing

NooCube

Alpha Brain vs NooCube

Overall Rating (From Our Experience Using Each Product)

43%
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92%
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Main Benefits

Positioned as a nootropic designed to help you reach and sustain a feeling of flow

Comprehensive cognitive improvement with a multi-ingredient blend

Scientific Backing

Some in-house studies - not considered scientifically robust

Strong, with many well-researched ingredients

Formula Complexity

Hidden behind proprietary blends

Comprehensive

Brand Reputation Concerns

Some detractors but low overall

Minimal to none

Cost

Premium

Premium

Commitment Time for Results

Weeks to months

Weeks, consistent use recommended

Servings Per Container

45

30

Capsules Per Container

90

90

User Feedback

Mixed reviews

Predominantly positive

Ingredients' Transparency

Opaque - hidden behind proprietary blends

Fully disclosed

Dosage Convenience

2 capsules daily

3 capsules daily

Potential Side Effects

Low risk

Low risk

Customer Support & Return Policy

Excellent, 90 day money back guarantee

Excellent, 60 day money-back guarantee

Product Availability

Widely available

Available through official site only

Additional Benefits

None specific

Boosts neurotransmitters, enhanced neuroprotection

Price

Introduction to NooCube and Alpha Brain

Today's world moves at an incredibly fast pace. With so much information flying around and so many tasks demanding our attention, it's no surprise that many of us are looking for ways to stay sharp and focused [1]. Enter NooCube and Alpha Brain, two standout products in the world of nootropics.

Alpha Brain, brought to us by Onnit Labs, got a lot of buzz, especially after Joe Rogan, a well-known podcaster, sang its praises [2]. It's arguably the most well-known nootropic brand. On the other side, we have NooCube by Wolfson Brands Ltd. Instead of flashy endorsements, NooCube lets its product do the talking, apparently focusing on delivering the best possible quality product and the most competitive price [3].

Both have unique ways of marketing themselves to the world. But what really matters is what's inside. NooCube comes packed with ingredients like Bacopa Monnieri and the antioxidant power of Resveratrol [4]. Meanwhile, Alpha Brain brings in its own ingredient blends. Different approaches, but the same goal: to help us think better.

NooCube Claims

NooCube positions itself as a forerunner in the realm of cognitive enhancers, making some rather bold declarations about its capabilities. According to the brand, users can supposedly hone their concentration to laser-like precision, enhance their problem-solving acumen, and revitalize both memory and general alertness [5]. Furthermore, a notable mention is its claim to shield eyes from the modern-day nemesis of 'screen fatigue' and mitigate the mental haze attributed to exhaustion.

But what garners attention is the brand's assertion that their blend is rooted in scientific validation. A cursory glance at the ingredient list, featuring compounds like Bacopa Monnieri and L-theanine, does hint at some familiar players in the nootropic arena [6]. Yet, as with any product, the real question lingers: does the amalgamation of these ingredients truly deliver on all its promises?

Alpha Brain Claims

Alpha Brain, a product of Onnit, bills itself as the key to reaching an optimal cognitive state [7]. They paint a tantalizing picture: imagine those deeply immersed moments when you're so absorbed in a task that time vanishes. Alpha Brain proposes it can make this a daily reality. Their assertion? By amplifying alpha wave generation and bolstering neurotransmitter production, one's brain can operate at peak performance2. Their blend supposedly achieves this through trademarked concoctions like the Onnit Flow Blend and Onnit Focus Blend.

However, a point of contention arises with Onnit's controversial use of proprietary blends. This approach obscures the exact formulation, depriving users of transparency and making independent scrutiny challenging. Such opacity could be problematic, especially for those who seek a clear understanding of what they're consuming [8].

Adding another layer to the brand's reputation is its strong affiliation with paid celebrities, most notably Joe Rogan. Beginning in 2010 with Onnit sponsoring Rogan's podcast, their alliance later evolved into a business partnership until Unilever's acquisition in 2021. With Rogan's platform amassing an average of 11 million listeners per episode, Onnit's strategic alliance with Joe Rogan has undeniably played a pivotal role in its ascent and it's no small part of Rogan's own financial success.

NooCube vs Alpha Brain - Real World Test Results

Our Experience with NooCube: Real-world Impacts on Everyday Moments

Delving into NooCube's potential began on an ordinary Monday morning. We, like many, were juggling a barrage of emails, meetings, and deadlines. By midday, instead of reaching for that third cup of coffee, we opted for NooCube.

Firstly, a tangible shift was noticed in our focus. Previously, multitasking often led to overlooked details or minor errors. With NooCube, tasks became singular points of intense concentration. This could potentially be attributed to Bacopa Monnieri [9], a renowned adaptogen believed to enhance cognitive functions, especially attention.

Problem-solving, another area NooCube claims to boost, was put to the test during a brainstorming session. Ideas flowed more freely, and complex problems seemed more navigable. This might owe its efficacy to Huperzine A [10], known to increase alertness and mental clarity.

Memory retention, often a challenge in information-heavy tasks, felt improved. We found ourselves recalling intricate details from earlier meetings or conversations with surprising ease. Studies on Vitamin B12 [11], one of NooCube'singredients, have shown its role in maintaining healthy nerve cells and aiding cognition.

Our extensive screen time typically results in strained eyes by the end of the day. But, while using NooCube, that familiar screen fatigue was notably lessened, which might be linked to the inclusion of LuteMax 2020 [12].

Lastly, NooCube promises science-backed ingredients, a claim we felt was substantiated in our experiences. For instance, Alpha GPC [13], present in the supplement, has been associated with enhanced memory and cognitive function.

Our experience with was overwhelmingly positive. The synergy between its broad-spectrum ingredient profile and the full range of nootropic benefits seemed evident in everyday moments, from clearer decision-making to reduced fatigue. It doesn't replace a balanced lifestyle, but for us, it certainly complemented it.

Our Real-World Experience with Alpha Brain: A Candid Overview

There's an appealing charm to the idea of having razor-sharp focus, a mind that's in "the zone," and cognitive wheels that spin at the speed of light. These are the promises that enveloped our experience when we decided to try Alpha Brain.

One of our team members, Anna, perfectly encapsulates the common experience many of us had. During her trials with Alpha Brain, Anna recalled the heady days of university when she could read dozens of pages without flinching. Sadly, with Alpha Brain, those days didn't return. While there were instances of heightened focus, they weren't the norm. The product promises the sensation of being so engrossed in a task that the world fades away. Yet, in our real-world tests, these moments were fleeting.

A closer look at the ingredient profile of Alpha Brain could provide some answers. The product's proprietary blends, namely Onnit Flow Blend, Onnit Focus Blend, and Onnit Fuel Blend, make it challenging to ascertain the precise quantities of each ingredient. Given the total declared dosages for each blend, a glaring question arises: are these ingredients present in quantities that align with clinically effective dosages?

Consider Bacopa Monniera, a traditional herb linked to cognitive enhancement. The optimal daily dosage typically ranges between 300-450 mg [14]. But within the context of Alpha Brain's proprietary blends, it's mathematically improbable for Bacopa Monniera to exist in its effective range, especially when sharing a blend with other ingredients.

Vinpocetine is another instance. Clinically effective doses start from 15mg [15], but within the Onnit Fuel Blend's total 65 mg—shared with L-Leucine and Pterostilbene—it's hard to envision it reaching its full potential.

However, it's essential to acknowledge the allure of Alpha Brain's goal to promote alpha brain wave production and neurotransmitter support. The emphasis on acetylcholine production, a neurotransmitter vital for cognitive function [16], is commendable. Still, without transparent dosages, we remain in the shadow of ambiguity.

To be clear, proprietary blends are not inherently problematic. They can protect a company's formula from competitors. But from a consumer's standpoint, particularly those acquainted with the world of nootropics, transparency is golden.

While the aim of Alpha Brain to get its users "in the zone" is admirable, our collective experience felt limited. The lack of transparent ingredient dosages juxtaposed with what we understand about clinically effective ranges leaves room for improvement. One hopes that future iterations might take these observations on board to genuinely unlock the mind's potential.

NooCube Pros and Cons


Pros:

  1. Broad-Spectrum Ingredient Profile: NooCube boasts a comprehensive list of ingredients, which include well-researched nootropics like Bacopa Monnieri, L-theanine, and Huperzine A.
  2. Science-Backed Ingredients: Most of NooCube's components have been researched extensively, and some have been shown to provide cognitive benefits [17,18].
  3. Protection from Screen Fatigue: The inclusion of LuteMax 2020 aims to shield the eyes from the fatigue caused by prolonged exposure to electronic screens [19].
  4. Reduction in Brain Fog: Ingredients like L-tyrosine have been associated with alleviating symptoms of fatigue-related brain fog [20].
  5. Memory and Alertness Boost: With components like Bacopa Monnieri, NooCube may enhance memory recall and mental alertness [21].
  6. Comprehensive Vitamin Support: The inclusion of vital vitamins, such as Vitamin B1, B7, and B12, ensure support for overall brain health.
  7. Support for Neurotransmitter Production: Ingredients like Alpha GPC play a crucial role in the production of acetylcholine, a significant neurotransmitter for cognitive function [22].

Cons:

  1. Requires Consistent Usage: For optimal results and to truly experience the cognitive benefits, NooCube requires consistent and regular intake. This means users can't expect significant improvements from sporadic or occasional use [23].
  2. Limited Availability: NooCube is exclusively available for purchase directly from the manufacturer's website. 

Alpha Brain Pros and Cons


Pros:

  1. Celeb Endorsements: The product has been heavily endorsed by celebrities, particularly Joe Rogan, which has increased its visibility and popularity.
  2. Spectrum of Ingredients: The supplement uses a range of natural ingredients, herbs, and vitamins known for their cognitive enhancing properties.

Cons:

  1. Opaque Dosages: The use of proprietary blends obscures the exact amounts of individual ingredients, making it challenging to ascertain its efficacy and compare it to clinical studies.
  2. Limited Effects for Some: Not everyone may experience the pronounced effects promoted by the brand. The real-world efficacy can be variable.
  3. Questionable Ingredient Levels: Due to the low overall milligram amount in their proprietary blends, it's unclear if many of the ingredients are present in clinically effective dosages.
  4. Hype vs. Reality: Given its celebrity endorsements and heavy marketing, some users might expect more dramatic results than they actually experience.

NooCube Ingredients: A Scientific Overview

NooCube Ingredients:

LuteMax 2020, Bacopa Monnieri (250mg), Huperzine A (20mg), Pterostilbene (140mcg), Resveratrol (14.3mg), L-theanine (100mg), L-tyrosine (250mg), Alpha GPC (50mg), Oat straw, Cat’s claw, Vitamin B1 (1.1mg), Vitamin B7 (50mcg), Vitamin B12 (2.5mcg)

NooCube stands out from other nootropics with its broad range of generously dosed ingredients. Each ingredient, with varying degrees of scientific backing, contributes to the cognitive enhancement potential of the product.

Firstly, LuteMax 2020, a trademarked ingredient, is widely studied for its potential in protecting the eyes from blue light, commonly emitted from electronic devices [24]. Its inclusion addresses the increasing screen fatigue in the digital age, ensuring that cognitive enhancement doesn't come at the cost of visual health.

A cornerstone in traditional Ayurvedic medicine, Bacopa Monnieri at 250mg in NooCube, is a renowned cognitive enhancer [25]. Clinical trials show significant memory-enhancing effects, especially when consumed consistently over several weeks [26]. The 250mg dosage aligns well with some clinical trial dosages, suggesting potential for efficacy.

Huperzine A, derived from the Chinese club moss, is shown to be a potent cognitive enhancer with its ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase, hence increasing acetylcholine levels in the brain [27]. While 20mg seems a generous dose, it's paramount to consider that prolonged intake might require cycling due to its potency.

A lesser-known compound, Pterostilbene, is a potent antioxidant, believed to possess neuroprotective properties [28]. Its dosage in NooCube is modest, and more research is required to determine its ideal concentration for cognitive enhancement. Similarly, Resveratrol is often hailed for its anti-aging properties and has shown potential in supporting brain health and function [29].

The calming amino acid, L-theanine, commonly found in tea, synergizes well with L-tyrosine [30]. These amino acids might support mood, reduce stress, and boost cognitive function respectively, with their inclusion in NooCube aiming for a balanced nootropic effect [31].

Another promising compound, Alpha GPC, boosts choline levels in the brain, supporting the synthesis of acetylcholine [32]. While the 50mg dosage is on the lower side compared to clinical trials, its synergistic effects with other ingredients shouldn't be undermined.

Oat straw and Cat's claw are traditional remedies with cognitive benefits, although the scientific literature on ideal dosages and efficacy remains nascent [33]. Lastly, the B-vitamin complex – Vitamin B1, B7, and B12 – plays a pivotal role in energy production and neural function, ensuring that the brain operates optimally.

Overall, NooCube boasts a broad spectrum of ingredients, it's evident that most, but not all, ingredients align precisely with clinically suggested dosages. However, the synergistic combination and the rationale behind the formulation is a well-rounded approach to cognitive enhancement.

Alpha Brain Ingredients: A Scientific Overview

Alpha Brain Ingredients:

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine HCl), Onnit Flow Blend (650 mg): This proprietary blend consists of Bacopa Monniera Extract, Cat's Claw Extract (AC-11), Huperzia Serrata Extract, and Oat Straw Extract. Onnit Focus Blend (240 mg): This blend includes Alpha GPC, Bacopa Monniera, and Huperzia Serrata. Onnit Fuel Blend (65 mg): This blend comprises L-Leucine, Vinpocetine, and Pterostilbene. L-Tyrosine, L-Theanine, Phosphatidylserine, Alpha GPC, Bacopa Monniera, Huperzia Serrata, Oat Straw Extract, Vinpocetine, Pterostilbene.

Alpha Brain has positioned itself as a forerunner in the nootropics field, owing largely to its high profile paid celebrity endorsements. However, a pressing concern arises from its reliance on proprietary blends, which essentially mask the exact dosages of individual components. This veiling becomes particularly concerning when we crunch the numbers and contrast them with established clinical doses.

To provide clarity, let's delve into the mathematics of it.

Bacopa Monnieri is nestled within the Onnit Flow Blend, which totals 650mg. Research consistently indicates an effective daily dose of Bacopa to be around 300mg for cognitive benefits [34]. Assuming an optimal dosage, this would leave only 350mg to be divided among the other constituents of the blend, such as Cat's Claw Extract, Huperzia Serrata, and Oat Straw Extract. Given that each of these also has clinically recommended dosages that often exceed this remaining amount, it becomes clear that not all ingredients can be dosed effectively.

The Onnit Focus Blend further elucidates this issue. Totaling 240mg, it encompasses Alpha GPC, Bacopa Monniera, and Huperzia Serrata. For Alpha GPC to be effective, doses usually range from 300mg to 600mg [35]. Even at the lowest end of this range, the 240mg total blend would be insufficient, not to mention the inclusion of other ingredients.

Similarly, the Onnit Fuel Blend, at 65mg, contains Vinpocetine. Clinical studies often recommend a dosage of 15-30mg of Vinpocetine for cognitive enhancements [36]. If we were to use the upper limit, only 35mg would remain for L-Leucine and Pterostilbene. Given that Pterostilbene's recommended doses start from around 50mg [37], the math simply doesn't add up for optimal efficacy.

What this arithmetic underscores is a fundamental quandary. The proprietary blends, by their very structure, make it impossible for all ingredients to be present in their clinically effective dosages. This isn't merely speculative; it's grounded in simple arithmetic and underpinned by clinical studies.

In summary, while Alpha Brain's ingredient list reads impressively, the undisclosed breakdown within the proprietary blends, when viewed in light of clinical dosage recommendations, raises tangible concerns about the product's potential efficacy.

NooCube Side Effects

NooCube Ingredients: Potential Side Effects

Bacopa Monnieri, at a dosage of 250mg, is generally considered safe. However, some users might experience gastrointestinal issues such as diarrhea, stomach cramps, or nausea [38]. Its long-term safety beyond 12 weeks of consistent use has not been extensively studied.

Huperzine A is known for its potential to aid memory. Still, in certain doses, it can result in side effects including nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, sweating, blurred vision, slurred speech, restlessness, loss of appetite, contraction and twitching of muscle fibers, cramping, increased saliva and urine, inability to control urination, high blood pressure, and slowed heart rate [39].

Pterostilbene is generally considered safe in small amounts. But at high dosages, users might observe an increase in cholesterol levels and a potential increase in the risk of developing some chronic diseases [40].

Resveratrol, despite its potential heart-health benefits, might lead to side effects such as nausea, stomach cramps, and diarrhea [41].

L-Theanine and L-Tyrosine are typically well-tolerated. However, some people could encounter headaches or dizziness with L-Theanine [42], or nausea, headache, fatigue, and heartburn with L-Tyrosine [43].

Alpha GPC is another compound primarily safe, but its usage might lead to side effects such as heartburn, headache, insomnia, skin rash, or confusion, especially at higher doses [44].

Oat Straw is generally benign, but in rare cases, might result in digestive discomfort [45].

Cat’s Claw, while primarily used for its immune-boosting properties, can occasionally result in dizziness, nausea, or diarrhea in some people [46].

Lastly, the vitamins: Vitamin B1, B7, and B12, when consumed within the recommended range, are generally safe. But excessive vitamin intake, beyond what's found in NooCube, can lead to imbalances or mild reactions [47].

Alpha Brain Side Effects

Alpha Brain Ingredients: Potential Side Effects

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine HCl) in standard amounts is benign. However, prolonged overconsumption might result in nerve damage, manifesting as tingling or numbness [48].

The Onnit Flow Blend has:

  • Bacopa Monnieri, which can cause gastrointestinal issues such as diarrhea or stomach cramps [49].
  • Cat’s Claw (AC-11), which might occasionally cause dizziness or nausea [50].
  • Huperzia Serrata, which, while aiding memory, can lead to side effects such as nausea, diarrhea, or vomiting [51].
  • Oat Straw Extract is generally safe but could cause digestive discomfort in rare instances [52].

The Onnit Focus Blend comprises:

  • Alpha GPC, which at high doses might lead to heartburn, headache, or insomnia [53].
  • Bacopa Monnieri and Huperzia Serrata, already covered in the Flow Blend.

The Onnit Fuel Blend includes:

  • L-Leucine, generally safe, but excessive intake can cause vitamin B3 and B6 deficiencies [54].
  • Vinpocetine enhances cerebral blood flow, but might cause some stomach pain, nausea, sleep disturbances, headache, dizziness, nervousness, or flushing of the face [55].
  • Pterostilbene, as mentioned previously, is safe in small amounts but in higher dosages might increase cholesterol levels [56].

L-Tyrosine could lead to side effects like nausea, headache, or fatigue [57]. L-Theanine is usually well-tolerated, but some might experience headaches or dizziness [58]. Phosphatidylserine is generally safe, yet can cause stomach upset or insomnia, especially in doses over 300 mg [59].

Overall Results - NooCube vs Alpha Brain

Overall Results And Recommendation


NooCube

92%
Fill Counter

Overall Rating

Alpha Brain vs NooCube

Alpha Brain

43%
Fill Counter

Overall Rating

NooCube vs Alpha Brain Testing
  • Alpha Brain: Style Over Substance? - Strong branding may overshadow a comprehensive look into product quality.
  • NooCube: Scientific Rigor: Emphasizes a transparent, scientific approach to formulation, ensuring each ingredient's dosage is research-backed.
  • Alpha Brain's Main Issues: Proprietary blends mask exact ingredient quantities, and key ingredients are underdosed.
  • NooCube's Comprehensive Formulation: Broad range of clinically dosed ingredients offers a broad range of cognitive enhancements, from memory to focus.
  • Our Verdict: NooCube outperformed Alpha Brain in our testing, offering a noticeable, sustained cognitive boost.
  • Trust Factor: NooCube's claims are not only evidence-backed but were also experienced firsthand, making it our top recommendation.

Overall Verdict: NooCube vs Alpha Brain

The world of nootropics presents a myriad of choices, and among the leaders in the field are NooCube and Alpha Brain. Delving into the nuances of their formulations provides revealing insights into their strengths and limitations.

Alpha Brain's proprietary blend approach is its significant limitation [60]. The Onnit Flow, Focus, and Fuel blends, while encompassing a range of nootropic compounds, mask individual ingredient dosages. This lack of transparency becomes problematic when evaluating the efficacy and potential side effects, especially when the total blend amount clearly indicates that many ingredients cannot be present in their clinically effective dosages [61].

NooCube, on the other hand, transparently lists its ingredient dosages. Ingredients like Bacopa Monnieri (250mg) and L-tyrosine (250mg) are present in robust amounts, aligning with clinical studies that suggest these dosages support cognitive function and stress resistance [62,63]. The synergy between ingredients like L-theanine and L-tyrosine can facilitate improved focus and a calm mind [64], which translates to enhanced cognitive performance.

Our experience with NooCube was undeniably more satisfactory. Grounded in the formula's composition, it became evident that the blend fostered an elevated level of cognitive performance, including better recall, attention, and mental clarity6. NooCube's combination of LuteMax 2020, Resveratrol, and Vitamin B12, among others, seems to offer a more rounded and sustained cognitive uplift [65-67].

In conclusion, while both supplements promise nootropic benefits, NooCube is more comprehensively and transparently formulated. Even more importantly, it delivered tangible and significant cognitive improvements. For anyone seeking a consistent, reliable cognitive boost, we'd readily recommend NooCube over Alpha Brain.

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